If you were forced to guess at any moment where one of the candidates is going to be between now and the election the smart money is on Ohio. There is no better proof that all sides think the state will be decisive this year than the huge amount of time all the candidates plan to spend there over the next two weeks. The Ohio Dispatch looks at the schedules:

With Ohio remaining ground zero leading up to Election Day, Obama wasted no time getting back to the state — just as he did after the second debate when he went to Athens last Wednesday night and addressed 14,000 at Ohio University. Biden, who was on the second day yesterday of a three-day Ohio tour, met Obama in Dayton after campaigning in Toledo.

The candidates will all but live in Ohio for the next two weeks. Biden will campaign today in Marion, while Paul Ryan, the GOP vice presidential nominee, will be in Cleveland. Obama will campaign Thursday night in Cleveland, the same day Romney holds events in Cincinnati, Defiance and Columbus.The latter event was announced last night. It will be at 2:30 p.m. at Worthington Industries, 1111 Dearborn Drive. Gates open at 12:30. Further details are at mittromney.com/oh.

Ohio GOP officials are expecting 17 visits before the election by either Romney or Ryan.

Even though President Obama holds a small lead in the polling, Ohio is still Mitt Romney’s best path to 270. It it theoretically possible for Romney to win without Ohio but highly improbable. Both sides know who wins Ohio will likely win the White House so it is getting blanketed with ads and showered with visits by the candidates.

It would be really nice if the candidates competing to be the leader of the whole country were trying to reach out to voters all over the country, but since we use an idiotic electoral college system both candidates are encouraged to ignore 90 percent of the electorate.

The fact that in what should be a national election only a few voters in a single state seem to matter should be a bigger national scandal, but an injustice allowed to exist for long enough eventually gets excused and defended as “tradition.”